Featured News 2016 Adopting a Retired Racing Greyhound

Adopting a Retired Racing Greyhound

Greyhounds are gentle and loving, and because of their short fur, they don't shed a lot, which makes them an excellent choice for warm climates. Greyhounds are generally good around children and tend to socialize well with other family pets.

Because of their racing background, a lot of people have the misconception that greyhounds are hyperactive. This isn't the case; even if a particular dog seems to be high-energy, they're usually easy to calm down.

Greyhounds are bred for sprinting or running short distances, not long distances. If you're concerned about spending hours at the dog park so they can run around, you don't have to worry. While they need regular walks like all dogs, they are fond of sleeping on the couch for hours!

What You Need to Consider Before Adopting

If you're looking for a guard dog to protect your house while you're gone and at night, you probably want to consider a German Shepherd, Anatolian Shepherd, Rottweiler or Doberman instead of a Greyhound. Even a Labrador would be a more suitable choice because Greyhounds do not bark much, and they may ignore an intruder.

Here are some things to consider before you adopt:

  • When a greyhound retires, they have never been inside a home, so everything will be new to them (including children). You must introduce everything slowly and give them sufficient time to adjust.
  • After living their entire life in a kennel, Greyhounds are used to being on a schedule. If you give them a regular daily routine for eating and going to the bathroom, they will adapt quickly.
  • Greyhounds are not housetrained, they have been kennel trained, which means they're accustomed to going to the bathroom in a turn-out pen. So, this is one of the biggest issues that you'll have to face.
  • Greyhounds are lean and have thin skin, therefore, they need access to soft bedding whenever they lay down.
  • Since Greyhounds have short fur and little body fat, they are absolutely indoor dogs, they are not outside pets.

If you're decide to adopt a Greyhound, be sure to talk with a veterinarian about how to properly take care of the new addition to your family!

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